aaarch
aaarch
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subtilitas:

Alphaville - W window house, Kyoto.
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Alphaville - W window house, Kyoto.
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Alphaville - W window house, Kyoto.
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Alphaville - W window house, Kyoto.
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subtilitas:

Be-Fun - Fuji Studio, Shibuya 2010. 
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Be-Fun - Fuji Studio, Shibuya 2010. 
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Be-Fun - Fuji Studio, Shibuya 2010. 
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architizer:

Paul Rudolph helped to pioneer American modernism: delicate, wood beach homes in Florida. Read more. 
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subtilitas:

Tato Architects - House in Futako-Shinchi, 2009. Photos (C) Mitsutaka Kitamura.
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Tato Architects - House in Futako-Shinchi, 2009. Photos (C) Mitsutaka Kitamura.
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Tato Architects - House in Futako-Shinchi, 2009. Photos (C) Mitsutaka Kitamura.
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Tato Architects - House in Futako-Shinchi, 2009. Photos (C) Mitsutaka Kitamura.
subtilitas:

Tato Architects - House in Futako-Shinchi, 2009. Photos (C) Mitsutaka Kitamura.
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designcube:

Wooden Pavillion by Ramser Schmid
designcube:

Wooden Pavillion by Ramser Schmid
designcube:

Wooden Pavillion by Ramser Schmid
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subtilitas:

Yuko Nagayama - House and retail store, Tokyo 2013. Photos (C) Daici Ano.
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Yuko Nagayama - House and retail store, Tokyo 2013. Photos (C) Daici Ano.
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Yuko Nagayama - House and retail store, Tokyo 2013. Photos (C) Daici Ano.
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subtilitas:

Yuko Nagayama - House with a hill, Tokyo 2006. Photos (C) Daici Ano.
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Yuko Nagayama - House with a hill, Tokyo 2006. Photos (C) Daici Ano.
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Yuko Nagayama - House with a hill, Tokyo 2006. Photos (C) Daici Ano.
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subtilitas:

Alphaville - Roof-hill house, Takarazuka 2013. Amazing light in this one. Photos (C) Kai Nakamura.
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Alphaville - Roof-hill house, Takarazuka 2013. Amazing light in this one. Photos (C) Kai Nakamura.
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Alphaville - Roof-hill house, Takarazuka 2013. Amazing light in this one. Photos (C) Kai Nakamura.
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subtilitas:

Ninkipen! - 4n house, Ikoma 2013. Photos (C) Kawada Hiroki.
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Ninkipen! - 4n house, Ikoma 2013. Photos (C) Kawada Hiroki.
subtilitas:

Ninkipen! - 4n house, Ikoma 2013. Photos (C) Kawada Hiroki.
subtilitas:

Ninkipen! - 4n house, Ikoma 2013. Photos (C) Kawada Hiroki.
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cjwho:

House in Yagi, Hiroshima, Japan by Suppose Design Office | via
On a narrow site Suppose Design Office created the ‘House in Yagi’ which consists almost entirely of concrete. The idea was to have an incomplete/complete form. Unlike other projects, the final stage of construction for this house was not aiming towards a finish stage, but to let the owner experience the sense of completion after living here.
The interior space of the house is designed to maximize the interaction to its surrounding environment. Ground floor material remained the same as the original site, with a single tree standing in the centre to present a natural contrast with the surrounding area. Windows of the 1st storey are kept open without any window shield or glass and creates an interesting interaction with wind and rain. Through this different interpretation of connecting the exterior and interior space, new ways of living can be explored by the client.
Photography: Toshiyuki Yano
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

House in Yagi, Hiroshima, Japan by Suppose Design Office | via
On a narrow site Suppose Design Office created the ‘House in Yagi’ which consists almost entirely of concrete. The idea was to have an incomplete/complete form. Unlike other projects, the final stage of construction for this house was not aiming towards a finish stage, but to let the owner experience the sense of completion after living here.
The interior space of the house is designed to maximize the interaction to its surrounding environment. Ground floor material remained the same as the original site, with a single tree standing in the centre to present a natural contrast with the surrounding area. Windows of the 1st storey are kept open without any window shield or glass and creates an interesting interaction with wind and rain. Through this different interpretation of connecting the exterior and interior space, new ways of living can be explored by the client.
Photography: Toshiyuki Yano
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

House in Yagi, Hiroshima, Japan by Suppose Design Office | via
On a narrow site Suppose Design Office created the ‘House in Yagi’ which consists almost entirely of concrete. The idea was to have an incomplete/complete form. Unlike other projects, the final stage of construction for this house was not aiming towards a finish stage, but to let the owner experience the sense of completion after living here.
The interior space of the house is designed to maximize the interaction to its surrounding environment. Ground floor material remained the same as the original site, with a single tree standing in the centre to present a natural contrast with the surrounding area. Windows of the 1st storey are kept open without any window shield or glass and creates an interesting interaction with wind and rain. Through this different interpretation of connecting the exterior and interior space, new ways of living can be explored by the client.
Photography: Toshiyuki Yano
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

House in Yagi, Hiroshima, Japan by Suppose Design Office | via
On a narrow site Suppose Design Office created the ‘House in Yagi’ which consists almost entirely of concrete. The idea was to have an incomplete/complete form. Unlike other projects, the final stage of construction for this house was not aiming towards a finish stage, but to let the owner experience the sense of completion after living here.
The interior space of the house is designed to maximize the interaction to its surrounding environment. Ground floor material remained the same as the original site, with a single tree standing in the centre to present a natural contrast with the surrounding area. Windows of the 1st storey are kept open without any window shield or glass and creates an interesting interaction with wind and rain. Through this different interpretation of connecting the exterior and interior space, new ways of living can be explored by the client.
Photography: Toshiyuki Yano
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

House in Yagi, Hiroshima, Japan by Suppose Design Office | via
On a narrow site Suppose Design Office created the ‘House in Yagi’ which consists almost entirely of concrete. The idea was to have an incomplete/complete form. Unlike other projects, the final stage of construction for this house was not aiming towards a finish stage, but to let the owner experience the sense of completion after living here.
The interior space of the house is designed to maximize the interaction to its surrounding environment. Ground floor material remained the same as the original site, with a single tree standing in the centre to present a natural contrast with the surrounding area. Windows of the 1st storey are kept open without any window shield or glass and creates an interesting interaction with wind and rain. Through this different interpretation of connecting the exterior and interior space, new ways of living can be explored by the client.
Photography: Toshiyuki Yano
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe